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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of Surgery of the parotid gland found in the catalog.

Surgery of the parotid gland

Anderson, Robin

Surgery of the parotid gland

by Anderson, Robin

  • 117 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by C. V. Mosby Co. in Saint Louis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Parotid glands -- Surgery

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 173-174.

    Statement[by] Robin Anderson [and] Louis T. Byars.
    ContributionsByars, Louis Thomas, 1906- joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRD527.P3 A5
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 177 p.
    Number of Pages177
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5942654M
    LC Control Number65013494
    OCLC/WorldCa5538210

    The commonest parotid salivary gland tumour requiring surgery is pleomorphic adenoma, presenting as a pre-auricular mass and the commonest post- surgical complication was facial nerve palsy involving the mandibular branch. A good knowledge of the surgical anatomy of the gland, clinical behaviour and .   Salivary gland neoplasms may be benign or malignant, and malignant tumors can be primary or metastatic. Due to the epithelial and the non-epithelial histology of the affected organ, many histological types of parotid tumors are possible, although some are rare.[1] Salivary gland tumors are characterized by diverse histological appearances and variable biological behavior.

      Parotid gland tumours account for 80% of all salivary gland neoplasms, 20% of these are malignant, but in daily clinical practice most parotid masses are operated on before obtaining the final histological diagnosis. This clinical setting further complicates the critical point of parotid surgery, which is the management of the facial nerve. Salivary gland tumours or neoplasms are tumours that form in the tissues of salivary salivary glands are classified as major or major salivary glands consist of the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands. The minor salivary glands consist of small mucus-secreting glands located throughout the lining of the oral cavity.

    Anatomy. There are two parotid glands in the human body. Each parotid gland is located high in the neck just below the ears. A salivary duct by which saliva is secreted (produced and released), runs through the inside of each cheek from each gland. Furthermore, the extratemporal (outside temporal bone) facial nerve and its subsidiaries run through the parotid gland and innervate (supply nerves.   Discussion • Parotidectomy is generally indicated for histopathological diagnosis of a parotid mass. Parotid masses are generally benign, the incidence of which is around per , [3]. • Factors determining the extent of surgery include tumor size and degree of local extension.


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Surgery of the parotid gland by Anderson, Robin Download PDF EPUB FB2

For many people with parotid gland tumors, surgery performed by a head and neck surgeon is the main treatment.

This operation is called a parotidectomy. The parotid gland consists of two lobes: the superficial lobe and the deep lobe. Surgery to remove a tumor in the superficial lobe is called a superficial parotidectomy.

Offering unparalleled coverage of this key area, Surgery of the Salivary Glands provides an in-depth, authoritative review of salivary gland disease and ational experts from otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, and many other disciplines discuss all aspects of surgery and medicine, including anatomy, physiology, histology, pathology, imaging.

Although you have other primary salivary glands, about 85% of all salivary gland tumors appear in the parotid glands. Nearly one-fourth of parotid tumors are cancerous. If a biopsy shows that a tumor is cancerous, your surgeon removes all or part of the gland along with lymph nodes in the area.

If you discover a neck mass or have concerns about /5(). Surgery for Surgery of the parotid gland book to the Parotid Gland and Tumor Infiltration of the Parotid Gland. Facial Paralysis Rehabilitation. Lymphoma. Radiation Therapy for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors. Strategies for Xerostomia-Tissue Engineering.

Chemotherapy and Molecular Targeted Surgery of the parotid gland book. Section 8 Social Impact. For most parotid tumors, surgeons may cut away the tumor and some of the healthy parotid gland tissue around it (superficial parotidectomy).

Removing all of the parotid gland. Surgery to remove all of the parotid gland (total parotidectomy) might be recommended for larger tumors and those that affect the deeper parts of the parotid gland. Salivary Gland Surgery. There are three large salivary glands on each side of the face and mouth — the parotid gland, submandibular gland, and sublingual gland — and numerous other small, unnamed salivary glands — known as minor salivary glands — inside of the mouth.

The gland is taken out to remove a blockage in the parotid duct. This can be caused by a stone, scarring, or a tumour. Most tumours that grow in the parotid gland are benign, meaning they are not cancer.

You will be asleep during the surgery. The doctor will take out the gland through a cut (incision) in your neck and in front of your ear. Parotid removal surgery or parotidectomy is a surgicalremoval of the parotid gland. Usually, the parotid gland is affected by a tumor, infectedor obstructing the saliva.

Some traumas to the head might also lead to parotidinjuries. Parotid gland may be removed if it gets on the way to a deep tumor orother structure in the brain, needed to be. The most effective way to avoid Frey’s Syndrome is to minimize surgical trauma.

The only way to do this is to have a minimally invasive surgery. Minimally invasive surgery only involves the parotid gland. It does not extend into the cheek, temple and neck, as traditional parotid surgery does. Minimally invasive surgery can be accomplished with. Introduction.

Salivary gland tumours are uncommon, making up around 6% of head and neck have a wide range of presentations and can be either benign or malignant. The malignant form will often affect the older patient, whilst benign salivary gland tumours have a peak onset at 40 years of proportion of benign and malignant tumours between the parotid.

To minimize the length of parotid surgery recovery and promote healing following parotid surgery, patients are advised to adhere to the CENTER's post-surgery instructions. Incision Instructions. Patients are advised to apply antibiotic ointment, like Neosporin, to the incision twice a day for the first ten days, followed by Vitamin E ointment twice a day and sunblock in the morning for the.

Parotidectomy is the removal of part or all of the parotid gland on one side of the face. The parotid glands are the largest salivary glands, but the patient should not experience dry mouth after removal of just one parotid gland, as there are multiple other major and minor salivary glands which will maintain saliva production.

Parotidectomies are done via an incision just in front of the ear. Parotid Gland Surgery Parotid gland tumors are the most common type of salivary gland tumor.

There are 2 types of parotid gland tumors: • A superficial parotid gland tumor develops in the part of the gland that’s over your facial nerve. • A deep lobe parotid gland tumor develops in the part of the gland that’s under your facial nerve.

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Anesthesia for Otolaryngologic Surgery. Use of a hemostat/stimulator probe and dedicated nerve locator/monitor for parotid surgery. Benign transient swelling of the parotid glands Author: Mauricio Perilla, Biao Lei, Daniel Alam.

Parotid gland surgery. Most salivary gland tumors occur in the parotid gland. Surgery here is complicated by the fact that the facial nerve, which controls movement on the same side of the face, passes through the gland.

For these operations, an incision (cut) is made in the skin in front of the ear and may extend down to the neck. Most parotid. parotid tumor generally requires removing the parotid gland (parotidectomy).

Parotid surgery is often performed through discrete incisions in the skin creases around and behind the ear. The surgery can be complicated because a nerve controlling facial movement runs through the gland.

When malignant masses are present in the parotid gland, it. Parotid Surgery The ENT of Georgia South team of otolaryngologists has a long track record of successful surgical procedures called parotidectomies, which is the removal of the largest salivary gland due to a tumor(s).

Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is a the most frequent benign tumor of the parotid gland, although in some cases it can turn malignant (%). Usually it grows slow and is removed surgically as a small tumor (average diameter cm).

Most huge PA tumors that can be found in the literature are of superfici. Joe Niamtu III, in Cosmetic Facial Surgery (Second Edition), Parotid Gland Fistula. Parotid gland fistula is a well-described but uncommon complication of facelift surgery.

A colleague had a case of devastating tissue loss from major parotid fistulas that compromised the flap in. It includes videos of parotid salivary gland surgery performed by Dr John Chaplin, Head and Neck Surgeon in Auckland. Salivary Gland Anatomy.

There are three paired glands in the head and neck that produce saliva. The parotid glands are the largest and overlie the angle of the jaw in front of the ear. There is a very important nerve, the facial nerve, which passes right through the parotid gland.

This makes the muscles of the face move and if it is damaged during the surgery can lead to a weakness of the face (facial palsy). In most cases the nerve works normally after the surgery.Removal of Parotid Gland.

The parotid gland is a salivary gland that lies immediately in front of the ear. Saliva drains from it through a tube that opens on the inside of the cheek next to the upper back teeth. The parotid gland is most commonly operated on to remove a lump.

Treatment for parotid cancer depends on the type, size and stage of the cancer. Surgery is a common treatment, and may involve removing all or part of the salivary gland or removing lymph nodes in the neck.

Radiation therapy relies on using x-rays or other high-powered beams to deliver radiation directly to cancer cells, in order to kill them.